Today’s Headlines

  • Miami Commission Votes to Approve Funding for Downtown Rail Station (WPLG)
  • TSPLOST 2.0 Clears Georgia Senate (Atlanta Business Chronicle)
  • Smaller Agencies Try to Limit MARTA Share as Fight Begins for Transit Money in GA Budget (AJC)
  • SC Transpo Funding Plan Would Raise Gas Tax, Lower Income Tax (The Herald)
  • Urban Counties, Plus a Rural One With a Prison, Account for Most of AL’s Population Growth (AL.com)
  • MARTA Has Come to Clayton County, But Crime Was Already There (Clayton News-Daily)
  • CAT Expansion Receives Chilly Reception Over Worries of Property Taxes and Crime (Savannah Now)
  • Cyclist Makes It From LA to Charleston, Where He Gets Ticketed (The State)
  • Atlanta: The Global Model for Sprawl (Globe Street)

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Today’s Headlines

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Regional Transportation Authority Finds Nashville Transit Lags Behind Demand (Tennessean) Report Says Tracks Can’t Accommodate Freight Traffic and Commuter Rail (Nashville Public Radio) Spring Hill Bike and Greenway Plan Receives Tennessee APA Outstanding Place Award (Brentwood) Tampa Designs Country’s First Public Health District (Next City) Palm Beach Post Writer: AAF, Financed With Tax-Exempt Bonds, Is a Triumph of […]

Today’s Headlines

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First Clayton County MARTA Rider Goes to Job Interview on First Day of Service (Clayton News Daily) New MARTA Service Expected to Draw 12,000 Riders a Day (Atlanta News World) Georgia Senate Passes Transportation Bill With No Money for Transit (WXIA, Mass Transit) Mayor Tomás Regalado Promises to Veto Plan to Link Tri-Rail to Downtown (Miami Herald) Yacht Club […]

Today’s Headlines

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“American Dream Miami” Mega-Mall Fast-Tracked by County Commissioners (SFBJ) Atlanta Approves $250 Million Bond Referendum for Roads, Sidewalks (Creative Loafing) GA Senate Funding Plan Lowers Gas Tax in Exchange for Annual Highway User Fee (AJC) Bills to Annex Three Metro Atlanta Cities Gets Senate Hearing (AJC) MARTA Service Begins in Clayton County Saturday, Minus Some Key Destinations […]
via ATL Urbanist

MARTA Expansion Is a Popular Idea in Some Atlanta Suburbs

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I took the photo above while riding the MARTA train home. It shows the traffic headed in the general direction of the northern suburbs of Atlanta. I thought about this view when I read the quote below from this week’s Are Georgia Republicans Learning to Love the MARTA Train? in NextCity:“I was maybe the first Republican to say it out loud, but many of us have been thinking it for a while. Roads and cars, in and of themselves, cannot move the enormous number of people who have to be moved.”– Rusty Paul, mayor of Sandy SpringsThat this quote comes from the Republican mayor of a city in the northern suburbs of Atlanta is significant. Long unpopular with the largely red areas in the outer parts of the Atlanta region, MARTA rail has suddenly become interesting to both leaders and commuters in the traffic-choked, sprawling ‘burbs.Things are looking up for an expansion of the Red Line it to the north parts of Fulton County, with public meetings happening and an environmental review in the works. And there are plans for rail expansion into Clayton County to the south of the City of Atlanta. Clayton recently became the third county, after Fulton and Dekalb, to join MARTA, paying for it with an approved sales tax. The agency is currently putting together a study of what use rail would get in the county.And in a fairly surprising news item this week, a recent survey shows that voters in Gwinnett County (northeast of the City of Atlanta) want MARTA extended into the county and they are willing to pay for it. Gwinnett is a particularly hard sell for transit, being very spread out and pretty lacking in walkable urban centers. These developments promise to put a fascinating spin on the long story of transit in metro Atlanta. The original plan was for MARTA to connect the five core counties of the region. But in 1971, voters in Clayton joined those in Gwinnett County in rejecting support for MARTA. Cobb County had already rejected it a few years earlier. That left only the remaining two, Fulton and Dekalb, as the service areas for the system.What will the system’s service area look like 20 or 30 years from now? It seems like serious growth is in the future for transit. But I wonder if the region’s built environment is ready for it. Specifically in Gwinnett, I think that a plan for the growth of walkable density is needed before MARTA could seriously consider trying to serve that area.